New Death Waltz Originals Release + June Music Mix!

Hey all,

Big newsletter this week. We have the debut of our newest Monthly Mix, a brand new Distributed Title from our friends at Data Discs, and most importantly, our first Death Waltz Originals release in a while.

As always, all new releases go on sale on Wednesdays at 12PM (CST) with the exception of our Distributed Title, OutRun, which is on sale right now!

We're excited to premiere our newest mix! Thirty minutes of music from the ever-growing catalog we are releasing in 2016. Listen closely, as always, and you may spot a cue or two that may reveal a previously unannounced soundtrack release, coming soon.

DEATH WALTZ ORIGINALS
Victims - Form Hell 10". One-off pressing of 500. Pressed on heavyweight opaque purple Vinyl with blue and grey swirl. $15

Victims is film composer Timothy Fife and Chris Livengood of Video Nasties (with a little help from ex-Wolf Eyes founder Aaron Dilloway) and they make the most incredible synth music you’ll hear in 2016. This totally reminds me of Tangerine Dream at their very best but with an added layer of menace and grime that gives the two pieces and incredibly tense and unsettling feeling. Layers of synths pulse, weaving in and out of the two tracks, creating an incredibly tense, dense and enveloping listen. You can listen to an exclusive edit featuring both tracks on this month's mixtape. 

DISTRIBUTED TITLES
OutRun - Original Video Game Soundtrack LP. Released on Data Discs. Music by Hiroshi Kawaguchi. Available on 180 Gram Mint Green Vinyl, or 180 Gram Black Vinyl. On Sale Now. $27

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of OutRun, our friends at Data Discs are delighted to present a very special vinyl edition of its timeless music.

Originally released in 1986, OutRun remains one of the most recognizable arcade games ever made. At its time of release, the music, by renowned SEGA Sound Team member Hiroshi “Hiro” Kawaguchi, was a triumph of imagination and creativity. It showcased a fusion of styles and influences, all ingeniously and inexplicably condensed into the confines of an eighties arcade board. The music was so integral to the game itself, that it is now difficult to imagine OutRun – or, indeed, the history of arcade music – without the enduring charm of Hiro’s soundtrack.